The Speech President Donald J. Trump Should Give

By Mack Rights

If I were President Trump, this is the speech I would give in Prime Time.

 

There’s been a great misunderstanding over the past week regarding what I said and what I meant to say.  I consulted the words of my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.  In reading over the Sermon on the Mount in the Book of Matthew, I came across Matthew 6:14-15:

MAT6.14 For if ye forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you:  MAT6.15 But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.

Then I read the short speech that President Lincoln gave on the Gettysburg Battlefield.  You’ll know this important document as the Gettysburg Address.  I was going to excerpt it, but there isn’t a word in it that isn’t important.  So, I will read them all.  Please take the time to listen and take in every word.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate—we can not consecrate—we can not hallow—this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Many Americans have actually never heard those words spoken.  That’s a shame.  These are the words that marked the rebirth of our more perfect nation.  I didn’t say perfect nation.  Just more perfect nation.

In the first line, President Lincoln reminded us of Thomas Jefferson’s words from the Declaration of Independence, “that all men are created equal.”  These are the same words that freed slave Frederick Douglass pointed to when helping to convince President Lincoln that he should free the slaves.  If Jefferson’s words meant anything at all, the slaves had to be freed.  Martin Luther King, Jr. later referred to the Founding Documents in his “I have a Dream” speech.

In a sense we’ve come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the “unalienable Rights” of “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

Now, I wish I had the time to read the whole speech.  I recommend that you take the time to read it once I’m done here.

For now, let me take you back to the Gettysburg Address.  President Lincoln said, “We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live.” 

The War Between the States wasn’t really a war between the north and the south.  It was a war between the Republicans of Lincoln and the Democrats of Jefferson Davis.  The Republicans in the south were helping those of the north, and the Democrats of the north were helping those of the south.  That’s just history.

Keeping that in mind, notice how President Abraham Lincoln did not only dedicate the battlefield in Gettysburg to the men who died fighting for his side.  He dedicated it to all the men.  Why? — Because they were all Americans.  He was trying to create a more perfect union.  He didn’t come to that field without forgiveness in his heart for the Democrats that died for their cause of dissolving the union of States.  Instead, he came with forgiveness and dedicated it to all the men that died.

So I will read the end of the Gettysburg Address again — only because so many people don’t hear what I say.  Instead, they only hear what they want to hear:

It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Again, Lincoln did not belittle the deaths of the men who fought for the Democrats.  He called them all the “honored dead.”  And he pointed out that we – the people – have an obligation to make sure they have not died in vain and “that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”  It is our obligation.  It is my obligation as your president.  Sometimes, what I have to do, as your president, isn’t popular with everybody, but I believe I owe an explanation for why I do what I do.

Consider this for a moment.  Why is it that the monuments to the heroes of the Confederacy do not point out that all of them were Democrats?  Think about that.  Many of you have gotten through high school and college without even realizing that slavery was the whole Raison d’être of the Democrat Party.

The actual reason that they do not point out that these men were all Democrats is that President Lincoln wanted the rebirth of our nation to happen with forgiveness.  Brother fought against brother in that war, and, if we were ever to make the union of these states survive, there had to be forgiveness.  As Jesus, with Whom our nation has a covenant, said, those without forgiveness in their heart will not be given forgiveness by our Father in Heaven.

So, in a time of great national emotion, those that despise me have tried to put words in my mouth and to ascribe motives of evil to that which I say.  The other day at that press conference, the gaggle of reporters wouldn’t let me finish my thoughts.  I did say that some of the people that were at that rally weren’t evil, but I never was allowed to explain what I meant.  They just assumed I meant that some of the white supremacists were good people.  That’s absurd.

That rally was called the rally to “Unite the Right.”  It wasn’t called the rally to “Unite the KKK and the Nazis.”  As a result, folks who might actually be innocent of the supposed guilt of hating other races showed up.  Many of them just didn’t want to see the monuments of history destroyed.  That is not the same as hating all people that aren’t white.

While I do not agree with the men honored by these monuments, I see these monuments as a reminder of how our nation’s rebirth occurred with the blessings from our Father in heaven that come with forgiveness.  It’s a reminder that, even though we’ve sinned by not being a perfect nation, we can be forgiven.  It’s a reminder for our family members who have sinned that they can be forgiven.  That our family members in prison can be forgiven.  That repentance does indeed earn forgiveness.

However, the constant calls from the politicians from the other party, to destroy all the monuments of the Confederacy and then some of the former slave-holding Founding Fathers doesn’t yield forgiveness.  They actually are calling for the destruction of monuments to Washington and Jefferson.  This is not a hypothetical.

Truth is, the metaphorical blood that doesn’t flow from the inanimate objects in the form of toppled monuments does not cleanse the sin of slavery from this nation or from the Democrat Party.  Only the blood of Christ will cleanse this sin, and, in the words of Christ Himself, only through forgiveness will forgiveness be given.

Before we embark upon this monstrous toppling of our nation’s history by pretending history changes if we eliminate our ability to learn from it, I want to examine the ultimate end that might result with this “by any means necessary” effort.  If we get rid of all the monuments that represent the sin of slavery to many, simply because they represent to sin of slavery to many, what argument do we have against getting rid of the monuments to the Founding Fathers like Washington and Jefferson, who owned slaves?

Once our argument falls, what argument do we have to defend the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights?  These documents are the product of some men who owned slaves.  If everyone that would defend the documents put forth by our Founding Fathers that were born into the ownership of slavery in the colonies of Great Britain is no better than the white supremacists of the KKK or the neo-Nazis, how can anyone defend the founding of our nation?

There are a lot of voices in America that would love to erase slavery from our history, but it can’t be done.  If we don’t stop them from erasing history by destroying monuments and burning books, we won’t be able to stop them from destroying government of the people, by the people, for the people.  President Abraham Lincoln said was our obligation.

I watched the father of Heather Heyer at her memorial service.  She was the girl that was tragically killed at the rally over the monument in Virginia.  He called for forgiveness.  That was unimaginably noble, and it must have been extremely hard. After referring to Jesus’ calling for forgiveness while on the cross, Mark Heyer said, “We just need to stop all this stuff and forgive each other.” I can have nothing but admiration for his ability to do that.

I know she didn’t vote for me.  That doesn’t matter.  Forgiveness is exactly what we in America need right now.  So, I would love to honor her mother’s desire to see her daughter magnified.

In a hundred years, I hope there is a monument honoring this young lady and her family’s message of forgiveness.  Let her death mark the moment when Americans from both sides came together in forgiveness during another unforgettable moment of national rebirth.  Let her name be remembered by all Americans as a symbol of national forgiveness.

I’m not telling you that, if we do this, we’re all going to live in sudden peace.  We’re not all going to suddenly agree on everything.  However, if you’re able to forgive your neighbor for voting for Hillary Clinton, and your neighbor is able to forgive you for voting for me, our nation will again be a little more civil.  If our nation could come together after the Civil War, in which 600,000 people died, I believe we can come together again.  Forgiveness should be our national goal.

Thank you, and God Bless America.

***

No, no questions tonight.

 

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